Prospecting On LinkedIn: How I Contacted 300+ People In One Month (Without Looking desperate)

January 21, 2023

Introduction

My latest experiment was to prospect on LinkedIn and reach out to 300+ people in one month. Basically, I wanted to see if I could get responses from people without looking desperate or spammy. I didn’t want my messages to feel like they were automated or insincere. So rather than sending out messages willy-nilly and hoping for a response, I decided to go about this in a strategic way that would help me build relationships over time.

I recently launched a campaign on LinkedIn to prospect about my upcoming SaaS tool.

You can use LinkedIn to find people that are interested in what you are selling. You want to connect with people who could be potential customers or partners, but it’s important to know what not to do.

You don’t want to look desperate when contacting these people by sending them an invite and asking them if they’d like to talk about something. This might work for a few people, but most of the time you will end up annoying people and they’ll ignore your messages altogether.

How do I know this? Because I recently launched a campaign on LinkedIn (which I will share later) where I contacted over 300+ prospects in one month without looking “desperate” at all!

Section:

LinkedIn is a great place to find prospects, and it’s also a great place to share your content. For example, if you’re a freelance writer and you write about how to write blog posts for marketing purposes, then you can use LinkedIn groups as an easy way to share your content with others who might be interested in it.

You could also reach out directly on LinkedIn by finding people who are interested in the same things that you are (i.e., writing blog posts). You can do this by searching for keywords like “blogging” or “writing.” Keep in mind that reaching out directly is not always appropriate—there are some people who might not want their inbox flooded with messages from strangers every day—so be mindful of how many contacts/messages per day you send out!

By the end of the month, I was able to reach over 300 people via direct messaging.

The goal of this campaign was to reach out to people who were interested in marketing.

I thought it would be great if I could connect with other marketers, and my assumption was right. By the end of the month, I was able to reach over 300 people via direct messaging.

Reach people via direct messaging

My goal was to connect with active groups in order to promote my book and share information that would help other marketers.

As a result, my goal was to connect with active groups in order to promote my book and share information that would help other marketers.

This may seem like an obvious approach, but I’ve seen too many people join groups and immediately start promoting their business or products. You can’t just jump into every group you find and share your sales pitch for your services, product or book—it doesn’t work if you’re not truly adding value.

You need to add value to people’s lives by being genuinely helpful and making a connection with them first. That way when they see your post offering something of value, they’ll open up their inbox because they know who it’s coming from!

It started by identifying the right groups.

The first thing I did was to identify the right groups. It’s important to find groups that are relevant to your target audience and active. If a group isn’t active, it won’t be worthwhile anyway because no one will see your posts. I made sure the groups were open to new members so I could join them if they weren’t already familiar with me or my brand.

The next step was joining these groups and posting content for them as well as commenting on others’ posts, sharing their content and engaging in discussions that were relevant to me (and my target audience). I also looked at what kinds of questions people were asking in these groups and answered some of those questions myself when possible. This helped build up trust within the community, which contributed towards me getting more responses from prospects looking for help with their own sales pipeline management struggles!

Engaging in group discussions

Next, I joined each group and observed the conversations for a few weeks.

Next, I joined each group and observed the conversations for a few weeks.

I made sure to join groups that were relevant to my business and had enough active members (at least 500) so that my posts would have a better chance of being seen.

I also paid attention to which posts performed well among the members—such as article shares or other types of content—and what type of engagement they generated (comments, likes, shares).

I watched what types of posts performed well and what type of comments generated engagement.

Once I had an idea of what my target audience was, I wanted to further refine my approach and make sure I was targeting the right people. To do this, I watched what types of posts performed well and what type of comments generated engagement.

I looked at the following:

  • What types of questions were asked?
  • What types of answers were given?
  • How many likes/comments did each post receive?

Once comfortable with each group, I began to participate in more conversations every day.

Once comfortable with each group, I began to participate in more conversations every day. While it’s important to be careful not to overdo it, you should also make sure that your posts add value for the group and not just rehash what others have already said.

Don’t post too often (more than once a day) or with the same thing twice in a row (i.e., don’t post two links back-to-back). If someone has commented on something you posted or shared his/her opinion, don’t immediately jump in with another comment offering yours—wait until someone else has commented first before adding your own thoughts.

By then, it was time for me to reach out and start adding value to individual members of the group by sharing content with them directly.

Once you’ve built up your own network of connections on LinkedIn, it’s time to start adding value to individual members of the group. You can do this by sharing content with them directly.

I started with a service recommendation post that had been shared in our Facebook group. Then I found relevant articles about how to be more productive and shared them with people who seemed like they’d benefit from seeing them.

It was important not to go overboard here, though; you don’t want to come across as being too pushy or salesy in your outreach efforts. It also doesn’t hurt to ask if there’s anything you can help someone out with—often people will let you know what they need help with when they see that you’re genuinely interested in helping out!

Be patient and genuinely helpful when prospecting on LinkedIn.

Be patient and genuinely helpful

The key to reaching out on LinkedIn is patience. If you send your message too soon, they won’t be receptive to your offer. Wait for the right time and send a genuine message that helps them solve their problem. If you do this, your prospect will welcome having found an expert solution to their problem, and they’ll be more likely to want to work with you in the future.

That said… Don’t spam people! Don’t use LinkedIn as a platform for promoting yourself or what products/services you offer without having first made some sort of genuine connection with someone via the platform itself! People are very turned off by this kind of behavior – it comes across as desperate and unsolicited: things that no one wants in their inboxes these days (unless we’re talking about emails from our banks).

Conclusion

I think the key takeaway from this blog post is that it’s important to be patient when prospecting on LinkedIn. If you find yourself getting frustrated and losing hope, it might be time to take a break and come back later with fresh eyes!

Aaron – CMO